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  • re: More LINQ with System.Interactive – Getting Started

    Hi Dax, Informally, duality is established by reversing arrows and compositions. So, let's simplify the use of interfaces and go with straight functions instead. Flatting IEnumerable&lt;T&gt; results in the following function: () -&gt; (() -&gt; T) Func&lt;Func&lt;T&gt;&gt; We'll ignore the fact MoveNext can return false or can throw an ...
    Posted to B# .NET Blog (Weblog) by bart on 12/28/2009
  • More LINQ with System.Interactive – Sequences under construction

    With the recent release of the Reactive Extensions for .NET (Rx) on DevLabs, youll hear quite a bit about reactive programming, based on the IObservable&lt;T&gt; and IObserver&lt;T&gt; interfaces. A great amount of resources is available on Channel 9. In this series, Ill focus on the dual of the System.Reactive assembly, which is ...
    Posted to B# .NET Blog (Weblog) by bart on 12/28/2009
  • re: More LINQ with System.Interactive – Exceptional Exception Handling

    Hi folks, Yes, the Using operator has been updated in the last release. This post was based on earlier drops and I forgot to update the sample, so I did that now. Thanks for letting me know, -Bart
    Posted to B# .NET Blog (Weblog) by bart on 12/27/2009
  • More LINQ with System.Interactive – Exceptional Exception Handling

    With the recent release of the Reactive Extensions for .NET (Rx) on DevLabs, youll hear quite a bit about reactive programming, based on the IObservable&lt;T&gt; and IObserver&lt;T&gt; interfaces. A great amount of resources is available on Channel 9. In this series, Ill focus on the dual of the System.Reactive assembly, which is ...
    Posted to B# .NET Blog (Weblog) by bart on 12/27/2009
  • More LINQ with System.Interactive – The Ultimate Imperative

    With the recent release of the Reactive Extensions for .NET (Rx) on DevLabs, youll hear quite a bit about reactive programming, based on the IObservable&lt;T&gt; and IObserver&lt;T&gt; interfaces. A great amount of resources is available on Channel 9. In this series, Ill focus on the dual of the System.Reactive assembly, which is ...
    Posted to B# .NET Blog (Weblog) by bart on 12/26/2009
  • re: More LINQ with System.Interactive – Getting Started

    Hi Dax, The IObservable-IObserver relationship is also one-to-many. Given one event source, one can have many subscriptions. The reason it matters is, agreed, more for academic satifsaction though it acts as a good catalyst for design: if you find a new great operator on one side, chances are big it applies on the other side as well. In other ...
    Posted to B# .NET Blog (Weblog) by bart on 12/25/2009
  • More LINQ with System.Interactive – Getting Started

    With the recent release of the Reactive Extensions for .NET (Rx) on DevLabs, youll hear quite a bit about reactive programming, based on the IObservable&lt;T&gt; and IObserver&lt;T&gt; interfaces. A great amount of resources is available on Channel 9. In this series, Ill focus on the dual of the System.Reactive assembly, which is ...
    Posted to B# .NET Blog (Weblog) by bart on 12/25/2009
  • Reader Challenge – Fault Handlers in C#

    The CLRs exception handling facilities provide for protected blocks (try) one can associate a handler with. There are four kinds of handlers, and exactly one can be associated with a protected block (but nesting can be used to associate multiple handlers with a block of code): A finally handler is executed whenever the block is exited, ...
    Posted to B# .NET Blog (Weblog) by bart on 12/06/2009
  • re: Jumping the trampoline in C# – Stack-friendly recursion

    Hi Jon, You can use this code wherever you see fit; just keep a reference to this post in there. Also beware it hasn't been properly tested and is merely an illustration of a technique rather than a definitive implementation thereof. Thanks, -Bart
    Posted to B# .NET Blog (Weblog) by bart on 11/09/2009
  • Jumping the trampoline in C# – Stack-friendly recursion

    Introduction Recursion is a widely known technique to decompose a problem in smaller instances of the same problem. For example, performing tree operations (e.g. in the context of data structures, user interfaces, hierarchical stores, XML, etc) can be expressed in terms of a navigation strategy over the tree where one performs the same ...
    Posted to B# .NET Blog (Weblog) by bart on 11/08/2009
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