Saturday, January 21, 2006 1:44 PM bart

Word 12 and the retired lazy dog

Maybe you know the trick in Word pre-12 to create random text: just type =rand() (you can specify parameters as well) and press enter. Word will generate this:

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.  The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

 

Cool. So, when I started to test Word 12 and didn't want to write a bunch of text, I thought to use =rand() again and guess what Word spits out right now (in the new standard Calibri font btw):

 

The AutoFormat feature in Word works behind the scenes to produce an attractive, easy-to-read document while you concentrate on the content.  Word analyzes each paragraph to see how it's used in the document (for example, as a heading or as an item in a numbered list) and then applies an appropriate style for that item.  Word also automatically formats Internet, network, and e-mail addresses as hyperlinks, applies bold or underline character formatting to text surrounded by asterisks or underscores, replaces two hyphens with a dash, and so on.  When you share your documents with others, you can track changes to see exactly what additions and deletions they made.  Then you can accept or reject their revisions one at a time or all at the same time.

If reviewers return their changes in separate documents, you can merge all their revisions into a single document and then review them.  If you want a record of changes made to a document, you can save different versions of a document all in the same document.  By tracking changes in a document, you can make revisions to a document without losing the original text.  When you track changes, Word shows changed text in a different color from the original text and uses revision marks, such as underlines, to distinguish the revised text from the original text.  By default, Word underlines and changes the color of inserted text.

It also includes a vertical changed line in the margin to the left of any changed text to help you locate changes in the document.  The AutoFormat feature in Word works behind the scenes to produce an attractive, easy-to-read document while you concentrate on the content.  Word analyzes each paragraph to see how it's used in the document (for example, as a heading or as an item in a numbered list) and then applies an appropriate style for that item.  Word also automatically formats Internet, network, and e-mail addresses as hyperlinks, applies bold or underline character formatting to text surrounded by asterisks or underscores, replaces two hyphens with a dash, and so on.  When you share your documents with others, you can track changes to see exactly what additions and deletions they made.

The lazy dog has retired :D.

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